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Dress code targets one gender – guess which one

A look at why limbs are sexualized at the cost of education

Female+student+bare+shoulders+on+campus.
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Dress code targets one gender – guess which one

Female student bare shoulders on campus.

Female student bare shoulders on campus.

Female student bare shoulders on campus.

Female student bare shoulders on campus.

Grace Gallagher, Writer and Copy Editor

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Del Campo High School Dress Code Policy.

Dress Codes are set in place so that students are able to learn in classrooms without distractions –  so why has the Del Campo Dress Code Policy done the opposite with spaghetti straps, off the shoulder tops and mid thigh shorts?

Several female students here at Del Campo have been removed from the classroom environment for small dress code violations such as wearing spaghetti straps, off the shoulder tops and wearing shorts. Pulling students out of class for this is, in fact, a disruption of learning.

Why are shoulders and legs considered distractions to men on school campuses, and why are these rules specifically targeted at women? Listed in the image above, is the Del Campo Dress Code Policy. As you read through, it becomes very obvious that most of it is directed at young females.

As women we are told to, “wear to school what you would wear in a work environment.” Yet we are not paid to be here, and we are forced to be outside parts of the day. In the blazing heat waves of summer, the young women on campus should be allowed to wear tank tops and shorts, especially running shorts as they are known to be comfortable and appropriate clothing. In 2019, school administrators should be accommodating to the rights of women to wear what is necessary in means of weather changes.

Even running shorts are against the rules, but if you look around our campus, the males have never been pulled out of class for wearing them. Only females have been dress coded even when they have covered all of the sexualized areas on the body. It has been a known problem and aggravation that women cannot even show their shoulders or legs without being objectified and targeted on school campuses everywhere.

A year ago a student at Missouri High School named Kelsey Anderson was dress coded and removed from class for wearing an outfit that covered her whole body, yet she was told it was “too busty” and “plus-sized.” Although Del Campo may not have situations as degrading as Kelsey Andersons, there is still a lot of room for growth.

It is still understood that private parts need to be covered. This is not a request to let us wear whatever we want, or to allow us to wear things that show cleavage and our bottoms. At the same time though, this is a request to not have women’s shoulders and legs sexualized, as every other gender has them as well. It is ridiculous that women are removed from their learning environments because our administrators and teachers are bothered by the exposure of a woman’s shoulder or leg. One could say that the dress code policy reveals more about the character of our administrators and societal flaws than it ever could about a students outfit.

It also becomes very apparent that a woman’s education is less important than a man’s, because the dress code policy is hardly aimed at them. Men aren’t the ones being escorted out of class. Men aren’t the ones being ridiculed about showing too much of themselves. Instead men are told to “just pull your pants up”,or to “just turn your sweatshirt inside out”. Yet women are removed from the situation, given loaners, and degraded all at the same time. We are made to feel that somehow our shoulders are too much for society to handle, and that covering it with a jacket or sweater still isn’t enough.

We are fed up.

The summers are continuously getting hotter, and the dress code policies seem to be getting worse, but only for women. We expect to feel safe at school, and because of what the teachers and administrators think of our outfits, we are not able to be. We feel targeted and ashamed while being dress coded for things that we should not feel embarrassed to possess.

Instead of the dress code being fair, we are receiving school punishments because schools believe that the male response to our outfits, is somehow still our fault. This encourages a culture of male dominance, and the idea that women need to cater to the needs and wants of men through our outfits. This allows a terrible culture of men being in charge of our bodies and what happens to them to continue. It is old and outdated. Change needs to be made.

 

By Grace Gallagher

Roar Staff Writer

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